7 Truly Impressive Ways to Cut Your Fruit and Veggies Real Fancy

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Photo By: Wallace Wong

Your Knife Skills Are Better Than You Think

We asked Chef Wallace Wong to share some simple (but hugely impacftul) ways to add a little extra pizazz to your fruits and veggies — perhaps you’ve seen his handiwork on TikTok? Try one of these seven ideas for your next fruit and vegetable platter (or all seven at the same time — why not?) and make it the centerpiece of your table.

Apple Wing

Take your apples to new heights! Create these apple wings by cutting your apple into six equal wedges, slicing lengthwise through the core. Start by making two small perpendicular cuts through each wedge that meet at a 90-degree angle. Continue to cut right angles into the wedge, making smaller wedges moving upwards. Fan the pieces into a wing.

Watch Chef Wallace demonstrate this technique here.

Apple Wing

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: As you get the hang of this technique, you’ll be able to make even more smaller layers. The more layers you do the more mesmerizing the wings look!

Avocado Rose

A rose by any other name may smell as sweet, but will it come packed with healthy fats? To create this delicate avocado flower, scoop out half of an avocado, leaving the half intact. Thinly slice the entire half widthwise and fan the pieces out into one long line. Then, roll it into a rose. Imagine the possibilities for your avocado toast!

Watch Chef Wallace demonstrate this technique here.

Avocado Rose

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: To keep your avocado green, submerge in water until you’re ready to serve.

Perfect Chiffonade

Chiffonade is a French slicing technique that translates to “made of rags.” We’re using red cabbage here, but this technique will work for any leafy vegetables or herbs. Begin by rolling the leaf into a cylinder and then use a sharp knife to slice thinly across the cylinder. The result is long, delicate strips that look elegant and pack a flavorful punch.

Perfect Chiffonade

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: The tighter you roll your leaves, the easier it will be to cut. If you are stacking multiple leaves, put the bigger ones on the bottom.

Citrus Double Twist Pinwheel

A twist is a simple but beautiful way to display your citrus fruits. Make a first slice into your fruit, but only go halfway down. Make a second slice and cut all the way through. Place the slice flat on your cutting board with the double-sliced half on the bottom. Make a cut from the bottom of the round to the center. Twist the fruit and fan out the smaller slices to make a festive and colorful garnish.

Citrus Double Twist Pinwheel

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: If this is your first time attempting this, make your slices on the thicker side so they don’t fall apart. You can work up to thinner slices the more you use this technique.

Pineapple Boat

Any food that comes in its own serving vessel is a win in our book. Slice your pineappple into four sections lengthwise, and cut out the core. Remove the pineapple skin in one piece — it will be your plate! Slice the fruit crosswise into thin pieces and return to the peel. Shift the slices in a staggered pattern for the full effect.

Watch Chef Wallace demonstrate this technique here.

Pineapple Boat

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: To pick a good pineapple, don’t go by color. Your pineapple should smell sweet, feel heavy for its size and be firm but not too hard.

Radish Star

This radish cutting technique will add sparkle to any plate. Start by cutting an “X” into the top of your radish. Then make cuts on either side of the “X” at 15-degree angles. Turn your radish 45 degrees and repeat. The best part? You can saute it, roast it, or eat it raw, and it shines just as bright.

Radish Star

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: Cut the base of your radish flat so it stands up and makes it easier to cut.

Strawberry Tulip

Make your strawberry look as fresh as a daisy…err, tulip. Use a paring knife to make small diagonal cuts in the shape of a “v”, going around the berry. Continue until you get to the middle so that you have two layers of “petals” and make sure you don’t toss the stems!

Watch Chef Wallace demonstrate this technique here.

Strawberry Tulip

Chef Wallace Pro Tip: A round strawberry will give you more petals whereas a pointy strawberry will give you longer petals. To make them look more like flowers, try sticking the strawberries on lollipop sticks or skewers.

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